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This website was developed, in part, under a grant number SP020332 from the Office of National Drug Control Policy and Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. The views, policies, and opinions expressed are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect those of ONDCP, SAMHSA or HHS. Developed by Genuine Quality Enterprises, LLC.

 

About CARE

Drug-Free Communities (DFC)

Support Program Grant

In October 2014, Richland School District Two received a five-year DFC Grant from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services – Substance Abuse and Mental Health Administration (SAMHSA). The purposes of this grant are to (1) support the efforts of community coalitions working to prevent and reduce substance use among youth and (2) reduce substance use among youth and over time substance abuse among adults. The Project CARE Coalition is a part of the Office of Diversity and Multicultural Inclusion (DMI). Current funding for Project CARE ends on September 29, 2019. The district has applied for additional DFC funding and will be notified before the end of October 2019 if the grant will be awarded.

 

Mission

The Project CARE Coalition seeks to create conditions that empower families, schools, and communities to reduce substance abuse and other high-risk behaviors.

 

Vision

A safe and healthy Richland Two Community.

 

Leadership

Dr. Helen Grant 
Co-Chair, Chief Diversity and Multicultural Inclusion Officer

 

Dr. Shirley Vickery
Co-Chair, Executive Director of Instructional Support Services

 

Sector Representation

The coalition has representatives from the following 12 sectors as required by the DFC Grant: 

• Youth (under 18) 

• Parents 

• Business 

• Media 

• Schools 

• Law Enforcement 

• Religious/Fraternal organizations 

• Youth-serving 

• State/Local/Tribal government 

• Civic and volunteer groups 

• Healthcare professionals 

• Other organizations involved in reducing substance abuse